Over-winter demography of the gray-tailed vole (Microtus canicaudus) in fragmented and continuous habitats
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Over-winter demography of the gray-tailed vole (Microtus canicaudus) in fragmented and continuous habitats

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Published .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Microtus -- Effect of habitat modification on -- Oregon -- Willamette River Valley.,
  • Microtus -- Wintering -- Oregon -- Willamette River Valley.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Heidi L. Brunkal.
The Physical Object
Pagination40 leaves, bound :
Number of Pages40
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18096523M

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Over-winter Demography of the Gray-Tailed Vole (Microtus canicaudus) in Fragmented and Continuous Habitats by Heidi L. Brunkal A THESIS submitted to Oregon State University In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science Completed Novem Commencement June We monitored demography, movement, and reproductive behaviour of gray-tailed voles, Microtus canicaudus, in experimental habitat patches (at a site near Corvallis, Oregon) with and without corridors to test the hypotheses that more individuals would move among patches in corridor than in control unconnected habitats, and that individuals would distribute themselves Cited by: Effects of Habitat Loss and Fragmentation on the Behavior and Demography of Gray-Tailed Voles JERRY O. WOLFF, ERIC M. SCHAUBER,* AND W. DANIEL EDGE Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University, Nash Hall, Corvallis, OR , U.S.A. Abstract: We monitored the short term behavioral and demographic responses of gray-tailed volesFile Size: KB. We monitored demography, movement, and reproductive behavior of gray-tailed voles, Microtus canicaudus, in experimental habitat patches with and without corridors to test the hypotheses that more individuals would move among patches in corridor than in control unconnected habitats, and that individuals would distribute themselves more evenly among patches if corridors were Cited by:

To determine if gray-tailed voles (M. canicaudus) responded to mowing of alfalfa in a density-dependent manner, we livetrapped 4 populations in each of low- (voles), medium- . The enclosures were stocked with 20 gray-tailed voles in early November Before perches were erected during the 12th week of the experiment, kestrels showed a .   Wolff, J.O., Schauber, E.M. & Edge, W.D. () Effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on the behavior and demography of gray-tailed voles. Conservation Biology, 11, – CrossRef Google ScholarAuthor: Michael Begon, Robert W. Howarth, Colin R. Townsend. Linear regression of population growth rates on population sizes for gray-tailed voles in control enclosures in (top) and (bottom) at Hyslop Agronomy Farm, Benton County, OR. We used the deterministic version of the Ricker model, N t +1 = N t exp(r 0 − bN t) to represent the two chosen populations (Fig. 2).Cited by:

We erected supplemental perches to evaluate their effectiveness in attracting perching raptors and to determine if an increase in raptor visitation could affect vole demography. Our model experimental system consisted of six ha enclosures containing gray-tailed vole Cited by: Over-winter mortality in small mammals is influenced strongly by low ambient temperatures. Individuals with greater thermogenic capacities might then be expected to survive better than those with lower thermogenic capacities. 2. To test this hypothesis, short-tailed field voles Microtus agrestis (Linnaeus) wereCited by: A total of adult and metamorph spotted salamander captures occurred at the Edge Pond during the two years. The mean angle of migration (ϕ) for adults always occurred in the forested, northwest quadrant of the pond (means ranged from ° to °) and movement was significantly oriented towards the mean angle (all P’s Cited by: Over-winter demography of gray-tailed voles in fragmented and continuous habitats. M.S. Thesis, Oregon State University. 39pp. Guiming Wang. Improving ecological risk assessments for nontarget terrestrial vertebrates. Ph.D. Thesis, Oregon State University. pp. Books and Book Chapters Edge, W. D. Wildlife of agricultural.